Mixed Bell Peppers

Mixed Bell Peppers

Who doesn’t love that satisfying crunch of a bell pepper? Also called sweet peppers or capsicums, bell peppers can be enjoyed raw or cooked. But the raw version gives you that juicy crunch that’s perfect for dipping and snacking. Also, when dried out, bell peppers are what give us that tasty spice, Paprika! 

In terms of health and nutrition, bell peppers are low calorie and exceptionally rich in vitamin C and other antioxidants, making them an excellent addition to a healthy diet. See below where we share some of the unique properties that bell peppers boast. 

NatureSweet mixed bell peppers come in various colors, such as red, yellow, orange, and green. Truly a rainbow of deliciousness that helps boost your snack time or meals with a fun crunch or a nutritious kick you’ll love.

  • 3 Pack
  • 6 Pack

Nutrition Benefits

1

One medium-sized red bell pepper provides a whopping 169% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) for Vitamin C, making it one of the richest dietary sources of this essential nutrient.

2

Bell peppers are a good source of Vitamin B6, which is important for the formation of red blood cells, which can help prevent anemia and improve brain health.

3

Bell peppers are a good source of Vitamin K1, a form of Vitamin K, essential for blood clotting and bone health.

4

Vitamin C, perhaps one of the best-known antioxidants, helps support immune function, and also facilitates the absorption of iron, so it may help prevent iron deficiency anemia.

5

Bell peppers contain many healthy antioxidants, including capsanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, quercetin, and luteolin. These antioxidants are known to be beneficial for preventing certain chronic conditions, such as heart disease and cancer.

Nutrition Benefits

1

One medium-sized red bell pepper provides a whopping 169% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) for Vitamin C, making it one of the richest dietary sources of this essential nutrient.

2

Bell peppers are a good source of Vitamin B6, which is important for the formation of red blood cells, which can help prevent anemia and improve brain health.

3

Bell peppers are a good source of Vitamin K1, a form of Vitamin K, essential for blood clotting and bone health.

4

Vitamin C, perhaps one of the best-known antioxidants, helps support immune function, and also facilitates the absorption of iron, so it may help prevent iron deficiency anemia.

5

Bell peppers contain many healthy antioxidants, including capsanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, quercetin, and luteolin. These antioxidants are known to be beneficial for preventing certain chronic conditions, such as heart disease and cancer.

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5

Which color bell pepper is the most healthy?


Great question, and it’s one we get asked a lot here at NatureSweet. Red, Orange, and Yellow Bell Peppers have practically equal amounts of vitamin A and vitamin C in them. But indeed there are some differences between the health benefits based on color. Only Red Bell Peppers contain lycopene, and just like tomatoes, it is the nutrient that causes them to be red. Lycopene is a heavily studied antioxidant that has been known to help prevent certain cancers. Yellow and Orange bell peppers are also rich in carotenoids. Much recent research suggests that consumption of carotenoid-rich foods reduces the incidence of several diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, diseases related to low immune function, and other degenerative diseases. And even green peppers have some interesting perks, as they contain Lutein, which is only abundant in green (unripe) bell peppers and black paprika, is absent from ripe bell peppers. Adequate intake of lutein may improve eye health

Did You Know?


Did you know, bell peppers, also known as Capsicum annuum, are fruits that belong to the nightshade family? You heard that right: bell peppers are fruit! In terms of their family tree, bell peppers are closely related to chili peppers, tomatoes, and breadfruit, all of which are native to Central and South America.

Selection:


At NatureSweet, we only choose bell peppers that are well-shaped, firm, and glossy with skins that are taut and unwrinkled, and their stems fresh and green. We recommend choosing to eat your bell peppers when they are thick-walled and juicy, and to test this: they should feel heavy for their size. Avoid bell peppers with soft or sunken bruises, slashes, or black spots.

Which color bell pepper is the most healthy?


Great question, and it’s one we get asked a lot here at NatureSweet. Red, Orange, and Yellow Bell Peppers have practically equal amounts of vitamin A and vitamin C in them. But indeed there are some differences between the health benefits based on color. Only Red Bell Peppers contain lycopene, and just like tomatoes, it is the nutrient that causes them to be red. Lycopene is a heavily studied antioxidant that has been known to help prevent certain cancers. Yellow and Orange bell peppers are also rich in carotenoids. Much recent research suggests that consumption of carotenoid-rich foods reduces the incidence of several diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, diseases related to low immune function, and other degenerative diseases. And even green peppers have some interesting perks, as they contain Lutein, which is only abundant in green (unripe) bell peppers and black paprika, is absent from ripe bell peppers. Adequate intake of lutein may improve eye health

Did You Know?


Did you know, bell peppers, also known as Capsicum annuum, are fruits that belong to the nightshade family? You heard that right: bell peppers are fruit! In terms of their family tree, bell peppers are closely related to chili peppers, tomatoes, and breadfruit, all of which are native to Central and South America.

Selection:


At NatureSweet, we only choose bell peppers that are well-shaped, firm, and glossy with skins that are taut and unwrinkled, and their stems fresh and green. We recommend choosing to eat your bell peppers when they are thick-walled and juicy, and to test this: they should feel heavy for their size. Avoid bell peppers with soft or sunken bruises, slashes, or black spots.