Tomatoes on the Vine

There’s nothing like the feeling you get when you pluck a ripe piece of fruit right out of the garden, right? That’s the reason we cannot get enough of NatureSweet’s tomatoes on the vine. These classic tomatoes are, you got it, left ‘on the vine’ to soak up nutrients in the stems and leaves until you choose to slice ‘em or dice ‘em. 

It’s also a crowd-favorite for the 30-minute chef’s kitchen because of its versatility. From jams, to salads, soups and everything in between, it’s no wonder those who love to whip up quick-n-healthy meals declare it’s easy to blend into most meal time prep! Most of ours are typically large and firm enough to be sliced for sandwiches, but they can also be used in canning and sauces.

  • 24 oz
  • 4 lbs

Nutrition Benefits

1

These tomatoes are sold on the vine they grew on. This helps prolong their shelf life!

2

Some research indicates tomatoes on the vine may contain higher levels of antioxidants and other nutrients “than those picked before peak ripeness.”

3

One medium (123-gram) tomato on the vine contains 3,160 mcg of lycopene — a potent antioxidant that promotes a healthy heart.

4

Tomatoes on the vine means the stems are intact, which gives these ‘matoes a more pronounced “tomato aroma,” according to a USDA report on greenhouse tomatoes.

Nutrition Benefits

1

These tomatoes are sold on the vine they grew on. This helps prolong their shelf life!

2

Some research indicates tomatoes on the vine may contain higher levels of antioxidants and other nutrients “than those picked before peak ripeness.”

3

One medium (123-gram) tomato on the vine contains 3,160 mcg of lycopene — a potent antioxidant that promotes a healthy heart.

4

Tomatoes on the vine means the stems are intact, which gives these ‘matoes a more pronounced “tomato aroma,” according to a USDA report on greenhouse tomatoes.

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Health Benefits:


Tomatoes on the vine are chock full of unique antioxidants, like the cancer-fighting lycopene, but tomatoes also provide us with a good number of recognizable antioxidants. For instance, tomatoes on the vine offer an excellent amount of vitamin C; very good amounts of vitamin E, vitamin A as carotenoids, and manganese; and good amounts of zinc and chromium. If you combine all research out there on the amazing anti-inflammatory benefits of tomatoes, it’s easy to see that these benefits work to support not just your heart health, but also your musculoskeletal system, renal system (kidneys), hepatic system (liver), and skin.

How to remove tomato skin:


We get asked this question a lot. Some opinions vary but the best way we know is to mark each tomato with a small, shallow X on the bottom of the tomato, and then cut out the top core. Then get a pot of water to boil, plunk in your X’ed tomatoes for 10 minutes and voila: the skin peels away simply and easily. Make sure to wait until they cool down, those lil’ ‘matoes get pippin’ hot!

Did you know?


The tomato plant, also known by its fancier name, Solanum lycopersicum, is native to South America. There it was first used for cooking by the ancient Aztecs. Since its entrance on the produce scene, tomatoes have gone wild with more than 7,500 different varieties now grown all around the entire world. We now have a variety of colors and shapes beyond the classic red, with yellow tomatoes, round tomatoes to oblong tomatoes, and big tomatoes to little tomatoes, to green, orange and even purple and striped. Amazing!

Health Benefits:


Tomatoes on the vine are chock full of unique antioxidants, like the cancer-fighting lycopene, but tomatoes also provide us with a good number of recognizable antioxidants. For instance, tomatoes on the vine offer an excellent amount of vitamin C; very good amounts of vitamin E, vitamin A as carotenoids, and manganese; and good amounts of zinc and chromium. If you combine all research out there on the amazing anti-inflammatory benefits of tomatoes, it’s easy to see that these benefits work to support not just your heart health, but also your musculoskeletal system, renal system (kidneys), hepatic system (liver), and skin.

How to remove tomato skin:


We get asked this question a lot. Some opinions vary but the best way we know is to mark each tomato with a small, shallow X on the bottom of the tomato, and then cut out the top core. Then get a pot of water to boil, plunk in your X’ed tomatoes for 10 minutes and voila: the skin peels away simply and easily. Make sure to wait until they cool down, those lil’ ‘matoes get pippin’ hot!

Did you know?


The tomato plant, also known by its fancier name, Solanum lycopersicum, is native to South America. There it was first used for cooking by the ancient Aztecs. Since its entrance on the produce scene, tomatoes have gone wild with more than 7,500 different varieties now grown all around the entire world. We now have a variety of colors and shapes beyond the classic red, with yellow tomatoes, round tomatoes to oblong tomatoes, and big tomatoes to little tomatoes, to green, orange and even purple and striped. Amazing!